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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, last year I bought this 125-150cc oil cooler on eBay for a hp 180cc engine I am building, $65, here are all the parts. The ad said If you do not know how to install it, Do Not buy it, but I never listened before, lol. If I remember right this adapts to the engine without splitting the cases, I believe. Going to PM CAM2, see what he can tell me. I assembled it they way it is in the photo. I think the top piece in the photo screws into the oil drain hole and the center hole goes thru that round alum barrel that hole an oil screen, that's it, thru the oil cooler and back to drain hole on the other side coming back from the cooler.
I know the mount bracket, not sure what the 2 small banjo bolt seals are that don't fit any of the parts in the kit and the 2 brass barbed fittings and 4 hose clamps. Then there is the plunger for priming oil to the system?? Then does the cooler mount horizontal or vertical so the oil can run down or accrossed.
 

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The GY6 has a very crazy pressurized oil system......The oil plug/ drainbolt is a vital piece....From what I hear the lower priced oil coolers are really only effective for 50cc engines whereas the slightly higher dollar coolers offer better cooling capacity for engines in the 180cc range

The oil plug gets replaced with that hightech adapter............

The lines and cooler get routed to a spot where it gets the best airflow....GY6's run very hot even stock......The oil cooler is like a much needed added savior...........I like to mount my coolers so pressure feeds and takes without the aid of gravity[fittings up]...The syringe fills the cooler with oil so the system is halfway primed on startup

I like to pull the sparkplug wire and crank the engine unenergized to prime the oil system before actually starting the engine to burp out all air...

Sometimes the chinese give you extra parts so you can cut the line to run it through the body if needed.....A 50cc scooter isnt gonna need as muchline to mount it

I beleive the extra clamps/ couplers and orings are for the less comprehensive oil cooler they sell that requires you to buy/supply your own rubber lines...

Because the oil strainer has a spring inside its most likely gonna get installed onto the oil out/ pressure in to keep foreign materials from clogging the cooler

Like I said the oil system is pretty pressurized so make sure you loctite all connections cause a leak under power will slap that quart of oil on the pavement pretty quickly and hopefully not under your rear tire..............
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, it is a strange oil system, I can see the pressure side of the adaptor that screws into the drain hole to mount the banjo bolts and lines to, have that line going thru the alum barrel with the screen and to the Rad. That drain adaptor has a rubbery donut cap on the end, not sure if that is to seal it or put there to protect it during shipping. That scooter thread, has a different system with rubber hoses and his case adaptor has 2 O rings to seal it. Not even sure what position the cooler will be mounted or where or how high, have to figure that out later. I will be able to figure it out when I go to install it. Remember I have a complete whole new 150cc engine w/ CVT and rear wheel axle. I think I have the 170cc kit w/ 61mm bore there is a 63mm bore I believe that is the 180cc and also I think they might have stroker cranks. Going to build it up complete w/ oil cooler then install it. Plan to tie it to the pads on my 1500lb. motorcycle lift rubber pads and then start to make sure the cooler and 28mm to 30mm KOSO carb, A9 cam and all that stuff is right before I put it in the scooter. The engine in the scooter now has 140 miles, its like new. I have two 170cc kits, want to mount a 4 valve head and A12 cam to that engine later down the road. You have been a great help, since I know very little about these scooters. I need to tighten up the fork bearings in the neck, way to loose, it came that way from the factory.
 

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Yeah, it is a strange oil system, I can see the pressure side of the adaptor that screws into the drain hole to mount the banjo bolts and lines to, have that line going thru the alum barrel with the screen and to the Rad. That drain adaptor has a rubbery donut cap on the end, not sure if that is to seal it or put there to protect it during shipping. That scooter thread, has a different system with rubber hoses and his case adaptor has 2 O rings to seal it. Not even sure what position the cooler will be mounted or where or how high, have to figure that out later. I will be able to figure it out when I go to install it. Remember I have a complete whole new 150cc engine w/ CVT and rear wheel axle. I think I have the 170cc kit w/ 61mm bore there is a 63mm bore I believe that is the 180cc and also I think they might have stroker cranks. Going to build it up complete w/ oil cooler then install it. Plan to tie it to the pads on my 1500lb. motorcycle lift rubber pads and then start to make sure the cooler and 28mm to 30mm KOSO carb, A9 cam and all that stuff is right before I put it in the scooter. The engine in the scooter now has 140 miles, its like new. I have two 170cc kits, want to mount a 4 valve head and A12 cam to that engine later down the road. You have been a great help, since I know very little about these scooters. I need to tighten up the fork bearings in the neck, way to loose, it came that way from the factory.
Those engines arent designed to be ridden full throttle for more than like 3 miles consistently....Its recommended to cruise 40-45 when prolonged travel is being done.....buying a turbo fan for the fancase would also be ideal..............

When you mount the coooler dont set it in stone.......The minimal operating oil temps for that engine I believe is like 175-180 degrees farenheit......

Any cooler than the regulated minimal temps doesnt help.....It thickens the oil and puts strain on the oilpump.....The oiling system relies on lots of volumetric oil flow to cool internal moving parts...especially the valves,, cylinder and the piston and relies on lots of nice cool airflow from the fancase to cool the engine oil which is awefully defficient.

Same kinda goes for your X18 w/oil cooler....if you do the oil cooler youre supposed to do the high volume oil pump along with removing the cylinder head and drilling the oil passage hole open from 1mm to 2mm's so you can ride full throttle for more than 2-3 miles without causing internal engine damage.............

When you run an engine harder than its capabilities you get an engine that drops off and runs very sluggish...When you stop to let it cool down comes back to life.........By doing this repetitively its slowly breaking down and killing your engine prematurely..........
 

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Discussion Starter #5
They tell you when you buy it, it's not a long distance machine. Mine will get near 60 MPH but that's flat out. It fills pretty good at 50 MPH, the plane is to get more horsepower and gear it for more top speed, they have all kinds ratio gear combinations. I have a 10mm spark plug TTO temp gauge I could put under the plug and or put an oil temp gauge in the system after the oil cooler to see if the oil is too cold or hot. I am just in the planning stage right now, making notes and plans. I have a couple of turbo fans and angled outer scoops that grab the air better than stock. I don't ride it that hard, usually ride around 45 to 50 MPH, to the store a few miles down the road and the Pacific Ocean is only about 7 miles away.
 

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They tell you when you buy it, it's not a long distance machine. Mine will get near 60 MPH but that's flat out. It fills pretty good at 50 MPH, the plane is to get more horsepower and gear it for more top speed, they have all kinds ratio gear combinations. I have a 10mm spark plug TTO temp gauge I could put under the plug and or put an oil temp gauge in the system after the oil cooler to see if the oil is too cold or hot. I am just in the planning stage right now, making notes and plans. I have a couple of turbo fans and angled outer scoops that grab the air better than stock. I don't ride it that hard, usually ride around 45 to 50 MPH, to the store a few miles down the road and the Pacific Ocean is only about 7 miles away.
Nope it isnt a long distance full throttle machine neither are the Honda clone engines.....I knew that back from when I had my very first 50cc Honda MiniTrail I had at 7.......

Taking notes and making plans is just the tip of the iceberg......The whole enchillada means totally blueprinting the entire build......Id leave the engine in the scooter as a test comparison mule against the spare engine youre about to modify............Not to mention if you run across a Ruckus frame you can build a pretty sikk onroad/offroad capable scooter................

When I was young I rode it maybe 10-15 minutes at a time and never full throttle for more than like 100-200ft.............Then years later I turned it into a mode of transport as a parts runner when my dad registered it and I cooked the engine in no time after modding it to go faster.....

My dad helped me take the engine apart and soon realized that the engine was cooked pretty severely....the crank, rod and case bearings were bluued to death.....:eek:

On my X15 it had the best of everything in the build and still even it had its limitations because of the massive 56mm piston squeezed into the stock cylinder.......I used to ride that thing 15-30 miles in one clip................

Good thing I had the Vapor setup....It has the temp gauge built-in with an audible/visual alarm when it hits the temps programmed in...................Theres ways to turn the sparkplug temp sensor into an oil temp sensor too..............

 

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Those engines arent designed to be ridden full throttle for more than like 3 miles consistently....Its recommended to cruise 40-45 when prolonged travel is being done.....buying a turbo fan for the fancase would also be ideal..............

When you mount the coooler dont set it in stone.......The minimal operating oil temps for that engine I believe is like 175-180 degrees farenheit......

Any cooler than the regulated minimal temps doesnt help.....It thickens the oil and puts strain on the oilpump.....The oiling system relies on lots of volumetric oil flow to cool internal moving parts...especially the valves,, cylinder and the piston and relies on lots of nice cool airflow from the fancase to cool the engine oil which is awefully defficient.

Same kinda goes for your X18 w/oil cooler....if you do the oil cooler youre supposed to do the high volume oil pump along with removing the cylinder head and drilling the oil passage hole open from 1mm to 2mm's so you can ride full throttle for more than 2-3 miles without causing internal engine damage.............

When you run an engine harder than its capabilities you get an engine that drops off and runs very sluggish...When you stop to let it cool down comes back to life.........By doing this repetitively its slowly breaking down and killing your engine prematurely..........
GY6 engine has been around a long time- originally developed by Honda, no longer made by them but basically copied now made in Taiwan and China. Many buggies/scooters use this motor 50cc/150cc+ and are pretty reliable (most buggies now use a factory oil cooler). It is an engine, like any engine, can run for extended periods of time wide open throttle- if your fuel ratio is safe and rpms are kept under the redline or maximum factor recommended, you should not blow up any properly built motor. An oil cooler on an air cooled motor is very important, in a GY6 the oil flows upto the valvetrain along the cylinder/head bolts, so it gets heated up on the way and soaks up heat as it moves. A GY6 motor does not rely on oil pressure to run- all crankshaft and camshaft bearings are roller bearings which do not need oil pressure as a regular engine like a lawnmower or automobile engine uses soft metal bearings that touch each other when there is no oil pressure. The only parts that require constant oil flow is done by splash lubing such as the camshaft lobes/rocker arms/tappets and piston pin and piston cylinder surfaces. Oil cooling hepls get the hot temps out of the engine, you really couldn't run an oil cooler that is too big, too small, yes. On first startup, the oil is basically ambient temperature, you can hit the throttle and the cold oil wouldn't blow anything up, the oil pump in these things is small and driven by a chain off the crankshaft and spins slower than the crank. most of these GY6 motors do not have an oil cooler but still survive 1000's of miles driving wide open throttle for extended periods of time- esp the 50cc when is basically all out or not keeping up with traffic. You can mount the oil cooler in any direction, once its filled, it won't drain back as the pump pickup and oil circuit is below the oil level. For example- I built a stroker GY6- 188cc and kept the stock oil pump but added an oil cooler, mounted sideways with no issues. so far now about 1200 miles on it and mostly wide open throttle as all my roads are country roads with hills and 55+ speed limits. Most important is running the correct fuel ratio- i run a wideband gauge and keep it around 12:1 under any power- 11.5 ish WOT. Just make sure you mount the cooler in good airflow, I did this by hold my hand around areas while driving around to feel the wind blowing where I want to mount the cooler. Gy6 is air cooled not water cooled so controlling temps is impossible, the fan blows air through the cylinder fins if its cold or hot outside as air cooled motors run hotter than a water cooled motor. Good luck on your project and don't worry, these engines are very reliable when maintained and not spun past their designed speed.
 
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