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Discussion Starter #1
OK so i lightened my flywheel by taking off 2 out of 3 flaps on it leaving only 6 on. I made them all even with a dremel. It's working just fine but i would like to make sure my flywheel is balanced.

I don't have a propeler balancer so how should i do this?

Thanks
 
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Dang why so many fins. i would go no less than 9 if your reallying on the flywheel to cool you motor.
 

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cut off every other one!! =) i was an *** and only left 4 fins on =/
 

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Hooligan
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Guys, doesn't matter what number of fins he SHOULD have ... read his post - he has 6. He's asking how to make sure the thing is balanced.

(Although I agree with you other guys - if I decided to do this mod, I'd only go to nine, myself ...)
 

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actually 6 fins provides the same amount of cooling, i just learned about this but i did a 9 fin to

the heavy side is on the opposite side of the magnets, take a 1/2" drill bit and taper the 2 holes opposite of the magnet. this will help a little but the only true way to balance it is to buy a propeller balncer
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
well a lightened and balanced flywheel costs less than a propeler balancer so....

POCKET BIKE LIGHTENED AND BALANCED FLYWHEEL HP PARTS - (eBay.ca item 230282207055 end time 20-Aug-08 00:12:03 EDT)

I'm trying to see if i can save a few bucks before i go and just buy a flywheel...

the heavy side is on the opposite side of the magnets, take a 1/2" drill bit and taper the 2 holes opposite of the magnet.
What do you mean taper them? And i don't see those holes... :S
 

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But propeller balancer gives the oportunity to balance your wheels.
By tapering he means making them bigger (bigger diameter). If you dont have any holes you can try drilling our own.
 

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^^^^ hobby shop, maybe around 30-40.
 

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Buy the balancer and do the mod yourself. Wheres the fun in just buying upgrades when you can do it yourself and actually feel good about it?

I would never buy anything upgraded.
 

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Ok, someone help me with this.......You guys are talking about balancing your flywheel by drilling opposit the magnet??? This is guaranteed to make it unbalanced? After any lightening, regardless of how much, the only way you'll balance it is to add weight oppersit the magnet, surley, unless you drill the magnet even more? Does the flywheel make up some kind of balance factor, it is possible that the magets weight is worked out bearing in mind the crank etc to get the balance factor correct? It would surprise me if this is the case though, I'm guessing that the flywheel being truely balanced make's little difference.
 

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Hooligan
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Okay, just so you bozos don't start pulling knives on each other over this, I found something interesting on another forum about balancing your crankshaft by way of adding weights to your flywheel. Figured it couldn't hurt to include it here:

A guide to internal and external crank balancing.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

G'day all

I decided i might give out my views on some good simple easy to achieve ways to balance your crank.

Warning: You will require more tooling than just a dremel and a blancer.

First off it is a good idea to take your bike for a spin. You really need to test your engine for balance at full throttle and load, as load on the engine will change the balance. So jump on floor it a couple of times and feel the vibration through the rev ranges.

now your ready to start balancing.

External balancing:

External balancing is a way to balance your crank assembly with out modifying the crank itself. This is very easy to acchieve by adding or removing weght in certain positions around the fly wheel to counteract the crank shafts out of balance.

The simplest way to externally balance your enngine is to drill and tap 2 holes in your flywheel 180' appart in the line of TDC and BDC (Top Dead Centre and Bottom Dead Centre) at the same PCD (Pitch Circle Diamater) and use these holes to bolt counterweights (like small washers) to the fly wheel.

Once you have your flywheel drilled and tapped insert a bolt and your starting guess of washer weight into the hole in your flywheel you choose to weight first. Start your engine and run it at idle, did it vibrate more or less. Give your engine a few more RPM (say 50%) and note if the vibration is worse or better. Take your engine to almost full RPM (say 90%) and note once again if vibration had improved or not. If you are aiming for balance at a specifc RPM range then only use your notes on that specific range.

If you feel the vibration is better at your desired RPM running range than before then you may well be on the right track. Try adding a slight more weight and repeat the test.

If you feel the vibration is worse at your desired RPM running range than previously you will probably be heading the wrong way. Remove some washers or possibly swap sides and test for vibration again.

Continue these processes until you have found your "happy spot" . Now you have a couple of choices, remove weight or add weight. If you choose to add the weight the simplest way is to just loctite your bolt and washers in place. This is best if you have your hole parrallel to the crankshaft axis as centrifigual force will not have an effect on the bolt coming loose.

However if you choose to remove weight from your flywheel this is a bit of a harder trick. You need to balance your flywheel. Set your flywheel up in a balancer of your choice and notice if the flywheel falls to your weight end or the non weight end.

If the flywheel falls to your weight end then you need to add weight to the opposite side of your current weighted end until it balances ok. Once you have your flywheel balanced you can now remove your original balance set and lighten the flywheel until it balances again. Remove all weights from the flywheel and you are done.

If the flywheel falls opposite the side of your weights you need to add further weight to your weighted side until your fly wheel balances. Remove your original weights but retain your "added balance" weight and lighten the flywheel until it balances again. Remove all the added balance weights and its off to the race track.

Bingo now you should have your own externally balanced flywheel.

Internal balancing:

This one is a bit tricky and a fair bit more time consuming. You need to start with a perfect balanced flywheel and clutch (if you cannot balance your clutch you can do a semi external balance which can be a pain though. You need to match mark your clutch and if you ever replace your clutch you need to rebalance your engine). You also need to have 2 holes drilled and tapped in your fly wheel similar to the one in external balancing but you should have your PCD for your holes the same as the crank journal PCD.

Repeat the same steps as in the external balance. Run engine, take notes, add remove weights until you find your "happy spot". Once you are happy with your engine balance dissasemble your engine. Remove your bolt and washers from the flywheel and weigh them (you will need good quality digital scales that can weigh 0.1g minimum).

If your added weight was on the same side as the crank journal this is quite simple to do from here. Take a roll of lead solder and cut a long peice then weigh your solder. Trim solder until the solder weighs the same as bolt and washers and wrap around the crank journal. You may now begin to add or remove weight from your crank to achieve balance.

If your added weight was opposite the crank journal this can be a bit trickier. Take your weighed solder the same as in the first step, roll it into a ball and sticky tape this ball at the same PCD as the crank journal on the opposite side (180' away from crank journal). You may have to take the weight of the tape into account. You may now begin to add or remove weight to achieve your desired balance.

Ok so that should be pretty much it. A nice simple way to balance your engine and the hardest work you have to do is remove and replace the starter cowling everytime you adjust your flywheel weight.

I hope this has been helpfull to at least some one.



Additional:

I appologise for the lack of information some people may find but i feel if you need a step by step guide for every motor i am affraid i cannot do this. This is just a guide to make life easy.

Also, this is theory, I have never actually done this before and cannot gaurentee it works but i will be giving it a run in a few months. So try it if you want, i cannot see why it wont work or you could just wait until i finally try it and i can review my works.
-------------------------------------------------------
(Original post by TheUFO on pocket-bike-racing.com.au - original post can be seen here: Pocket Bike Racing - A guide to internal and external crank balancing. )
 

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Ok, someone help me with this.......You guys are talking about balancing your flywheel by drilling opposit the magnet??? This is guaranteed to make it unbalanced? After any lightening, regardless of how much, the only way you'll balance it is to add weight oppersit the magnet, surley, unless you drill the magnet even more? Does the flywheel make up some kind of balance factor, it is possible that the magets weight is worked out bearing in mind the crank etc to get the balance factor correct? It would surprise me if this is the case though, I'm guessing that the flywheel being truely balanced make's little difference.
actually the magnet side is lighter, so by drilling it out, the flywheel is better balanced, but not perfectly, its just better than nothing
 

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Hmmmm interesting stuff, thanks fella's. Does anyone else have anymore info, idea's or what different things have you tried to improve this area of the bike and what results did you get???? Questions, questions, questions....! :)
 

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buy a prop balancer! you can also balance the clutch and crank if you can split it and put it back together. dont buy the magnetic one its worthless buy the dubro brand and no you cant balance wheels with it you'll need an actual motorcycle wheel balancer for that they're about $150

by the way Juanitoboy hit the nail on the head! using a 1/2" drill bit taper the 2 small holes opposite the magnets on the backside of the flywheel it will get you closer but even the slightest bit either too much or too little will throw it back off balance either way stock they're far out of balance so you're only helping matters in this case.

heres a test! put the flywheel on a drill and spin it! if it wobbles out of control its a no go if it spins true then bolt that sucker on!
 

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Okay, just so you bozos don't start pulling knives on each other over this, I found something interesting on another forum about balancing your crankshaft by way of adding weights to your flywheel. Figured it couldn't hurt to include it here:

A guide to internal and external crank balancing.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

G'day all

I decided i might give out my views on some good simple easy to achieve ways to balance your crank.

Warning: You will require more tooling than just a dremel and a blancer.

First off it is a good idea to take your bike for a spin. You really need to test your engine for balance at full throttle and load, as load on the engine will change the balance. So jump on floor it a couple of times and feel the vibration through the rev ranges.

now your ready to start balancing.

External balancing:

External balancing is a way to balance your crank assembly with out modifying the crank itself. This is very easy to acchieve by adding or removing weght in certain positions around the fly wheel to counteract the crank shafts out of balance.

The simplest way to externally balance your enngine is to drill and tap 2 holes in your flywheel 180' appart in the line of TDC and BDC (Top Dead Centre and Bottom Dead Centre) at the same PCD (Pitch Circle Diamater) and use these holes to bolt counterweights (like small washers) to the fly wheel.

Once you have your flywheel drilled and tapped insert a bolt and your starting guess of washer weight into the hole in your flywheel you choose to weight first. Start your engine and run it at idle, did it vibrate more or less. Give your engine a few more RPM (say 50%) and note if the vibration is worse or better. Take your engine to almost full RPM (say 90%) and note once again if vibration had improved or not. If you are aiming for balance at a specifc RPM range then only use your notes on that specific range.

If you feel the vibration is better at your desired RPM running range than before then you may well be on the right track. Try adding a slight more weight and repeat the test.

If you feel the vibration is worse at your desired RPM running range than previously you will probably be heading the wrong way. Remove some washers or possibly swap sides and test for vibration again.

Continue these processes until you have found your "happy spot" . Now you have a couple of choices, remove weight or add weight. If you choose to add the weight the simplest way is to just loctite your bolt and washers in place. This is best if you have your hole parrallel to the crankshaft axis as centrifigual force will not have an effect on the bolt coming loose.

However if you choose to remove weight from your flywheel this is a bit of a harder trick. You need to balance your flywheel. Set your flywheel up in a balancer of your choice and notice if the flywheel falls to your weight end or the non weight end.

If the flywheel falls to your weight end then you need to add weight to the opposite side of your current weighted end until it balances ok. Once you have your flywheel balanced you can now remove your original balance set and lighten the flywheel until it balances again. Remove all weights from the flywheel and you are done.

If the flywheel falls opposite the side of your weights you need to add further weight to your weighted side until your fly wheel balances. Remove your original weights but retain your "added balance" weight and lighten the flywheel until it balances again. Remove all the added balance weights and its off to the race track.

Bingo now you should have your own externally balanced flywheel.

Internal balancing:

This one is a bit tricky and a fair bit more time consuming. You need to start with a perfect balanced flywheel and clutch (if you cannot balance your clutch you can do a semi external balance which can be a pain though. You need to match mark your clutch and if you ever replace your clutch you need to rebalance your engine). You also need to have 2 holes drilled and tapped in your fly wheel similar to the one in external balancing but you should have your PCD for your holes the same as the crank journal PCD.

Repeat the same steps as in the external balance. Run engine, take notes, add remove weights until you find your "happy spot". Once you are happy with your engine balance dissasemble your engine. Remove your bolt and washers from the flywheel and weigh them (you will need good quality digital scales that can weigh 0.1g minimum).

If your added weight was on the same side as the crank journal this is quite simple to do from here. Take a roll of lead solder and cut a long peice then weigh your solder. Trim solder until the solder weighs the same as bolt and washers and wrap around the crank journal. You may now begin to add or remove weight from your crank to achieve balance.

If your added weight was opposite the crank journal this can be a bit trickier. Take your weighed solder the same as in the first step, roll it into a ball and sticky tape this ball at the same PCD as the crank journal on the opposite side (180' away from crank journal). You may have to take the weight of the tape into account. You may now begin to add or remove weight to achieve your desired balance.

Ok so that should be pretty much it. A nice simple way to balance your engine and the hardest work you have to do is remove and replace the starter cowling everytime you adjust your flywheel weight.

I hope this has been helpfull to at least some one.



Additional:

I appologise for the lack of information some people may find but i feel if you need a step by step guide for every motor i am affraid i cannot do this. This is just a guide to make life easy.

Also, this is theory, I have never actually done this before and cannot gaurentee it works but i will be giving it a run in a few months. So try it if you want, i cannot see why it wont work or you could just wait until i finally try it and i can review my works.
-------------------------------------------------------
(Original post by TheUFO on pocket-bike-racing.com.au - original post can be seen here: Pocket Bike Racing - A guide to internal and external crank balancing. )
I tested this out with a very negative outcome
 
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