Pocketbike Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Originally Posted by SnowBoardGeek1

Original Page at CagArmy

First thing to do, is to read over the manual. It may not be great (9 times out of 10, it’s the same manual they copied from Blata), but it will give some useful information on what the bike is about.​

Look over the bike and take notice of the parts that you will either be upgrading or fixing in the future. Air filter (black box), carb (connected to the black box), exhaust (muffler and expansion chamber), front and rear brakes, etc.​

Keep in mind, that these bikes are poorly made from the factory, which means every new bike will have some flaws. Here are some steps that you should take before even attempting to start the bike.​

1. Clean out the gas tank. Almost all cagllari pocketbikes have plastic debris inside the gas tank. If fuel is added to the tank without prior cleaning, the plastic shavings will get caught in the carb, and will clog up the holes (jet, pet*censored* holes, float bowl, etc). If this happens, performance will be greatly affected. Multiple problems such as bogging at WOT, low/high/rough idle, no power at any given throttle, etc. If you are experiencing any of these problems, most likely you have a clogged up carb and will need to take apart the carb and clean every single little hole and make sure its free from debris.​

To clean out the gas tank, take out the top fairing (seat area). Since I have a FF Cag, I will include steps on how to take out the fairing for the FF cag. Its pretty much the same for the half fairing versions as well. The top fairing has 5 hex bolts, 4 on the seat, one located just ahead of the gas cap. Take them off and place them somewhere safe so you know where its at. Take off the gas cap as well. Once you have the fairing off, you will see the tank. Take off the fuel line that connects from the tank to the carb.​

Once you have the tank in hand, shake it. You probably can hear the plastic shavings hitting against the inside of the tank. Rinse it out. I used water, but remember, water and fuel do not mix, therefore if you use water, make sure its completely dried before reinstalling. Use an air compressor or can of air to dry up everything inside. You can also use rubbing alcohol (dries up pretty fast), or even gas (to be safe) to rinse out the tank.​

Install a fuel filter. Go to an auto parts store (i.e Napa, Autozone, etc.) and get a fuel filter. From Napa, the part number is #3011. It’s a paper element fuel filter, and small enough to install on the pocketbike. There are numerous fuel filters out in the market that are made for small engines. I chose to use a fuel filter with a micron mesh (stainless steel mesh). I bought mine from a motorcycle shop. If you do go to a motorcycle shop, just ask the sales personnel for a fuel filter that fits two stroke engines. Let them know you have a pocketbike and they’ll get you a fuel filter that’s small enough to fit in the pocketbike. Cost for the fuel filter ranges from $2.00 to $5.00. While you’re at the auto parts store or motorcycle shop, get some steel clamps that will fit a ¼ inch fuel line. You’ll need four of them to clamp on each end (one at the nozzle of the gas tank, two for each end of the fuel filter, and one at the fuel line that connects to the carb).​

Cut out one end of the fuel line and connect the fuel filter (for the Napa fuel filter, make sure the arrow is pointed down). Take note on how much fuel line you’re cutting. Cutting too much will leave you without enough fuel line, and you’ll have to go buy a new one. If you do end up cutting too much fuel line, go to your auto parts store and find some high quality fuel line that has an Inside Diameter (I.D) of ¼ inch. They usually sell the steel braided reinforced fuel line. Those work great because the rubber they use is fuel resistant, which means the fuel will not eat up the inside and outside of the rubber.​

At the other end of the fuel filter, connect the fuel line to the carb. Make sure you use the steel clamps to clamp down on the fuel line so the fuel won’t leak.​

Install the fuel line and filter to the gas tank, make sure the fuel line isn’t kinked to where it will prevent fuel from going into the carb, bolt up the fairing, and you’re finished.​

The reason for installing the fuel filter, is to prevent any accidental debris from getting into the carb. Also, this will make sure the fuel/oil mixture going into the carb, is clean at all times.​

3. Loctite all the bolts you can. These bikes create a lot of vibration (the crank isn’t balanced, frame is not strong, etc.), and bolts will start to come loose at some point. The most important bolts to loctite will be the engine bolts. There are three underneath the engine, and also the top engine bolt that connects to the frame. Take those bolts off and put some loctite on them. This will help the bolts stay in tight. You can buy loctite (I use the blue loctite) at any auto parts store.​

4. Adjust the handlebars and brakes to your liking. For the handlebars, there is usually just one nut to loosen and from there you will be able to adjust them accordingly. For the brakes, also, there is one nut where you can adjust the brake line to either increase or decrease tension. Check to make sure the wheels spin freely (both front and rear). For the rear, the wheel will spin at least 1.5 – 2 times before the clutch will start to grab and prevent the wheel from spinning freely.​

5. Check the tire pressures for both tires and make sure they’re within the limits specified on the tire itself.​

6. You’re ready to start the bike! Make sure to pull out about 2-3 inches of slack from the starter rope. This will make sure the claws are grabbing the flywheel good. Give a quick continuous pull. It should start within 3-4 pulls. If you’re good, one pull should be sufficed. Good luck and I hope this tutorial helped you out.​
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
I dont know if the handle bars are all the same, but if your bike has the clip ons that have 2 allen bolts clampin them the the fork, and then oen phillips(maybe hex on other bikes) that hold the round bar to the clamp. locktite that screw, Ive never seen the clamps loosen but my friends bike, that phillips screw comes loose about every 10 minutes. he is going to use locktite soon but it is so annoying having it loosening itself all he time,Im going to locktite mine from the get-go so I never have to deal with that.

and thanks for this info, will come in handy if FED EX comes thorugh and gets me my bike tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
my rear wheel wont spin freely.. i tried loosening those tensioners at the back but it didnt help much.. could it just be the chain needs lube? also.. is it bad to turn you back wheel when you havent had any gas or oil in it yet? will it score the pistons?

ALSO.. can sumone post sum pics on how to clean the carb? i want to clean mine b4 i even start the thing but i dont know wat skrews to undo or anything ect.. thx

-marc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
n/m on the wheel thing.. it was my fault.. i forgot to loosen the wheel bolts before messin with the tensioners.. lmao.. but my back rotor seems to have a ruff spot on it.. its not bad.. i think its mostly just the dirt.. can i use WD40? or will it skrew up the tires? also.. will using WD40 to remove sticker goo skrew up the paint.. even if i wash it off after?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
WD40 wont take off paint AS FAR AS I KNOW, I have gotten it on paint all the time though. and no it wont ruin the tires. WD40 isnt the best thing to get the sticker goo off wiht though, something like nail polish remover, acetone works WAY WAY better, and if you dont want something that harsh on your bike get some goo gone or soak a rag in simple green and just let it lay on the sticker(not for real long though, I spilled alot of it once, soaked it up in a rag and threw the rag on my orange metal toolbox, well, now my toolbox is not all orange, it just ruined the paints bond to the box, looked fine but when I rubbed it there the paint came off in a sheet of paint) goo gone would be best bet.

also if its dirt on the rotor use acetone or soemthing like that, no WD40, although the rear brake does about nothing on these little things you dont want any kind of residue on the rotor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
thx man.. i was thinkin of goo gone.. i didnt think of acetone tho.. i have that rite now.. so thats wat i'll use prolly

ne one know of any REAL chrome paints? that can match to how chrome looks? i wanna fix my scratches.. other wise i'll just end up paintin the whole bike.. lmao.. perfectionist..

oh yea.. i still do need info on cleaning the carb.. thx..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Thanks for the reposts.


No doubt change that fuel filter. Mine looked like something that came from the gumball machine.

By the way, no joke, the cag i bought today, the filter was installed backwards! The irony of course is, out of the box, this cag came with a quality control tag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,454 Posts
Thanks for posting my writeup.

On the how to cag section, I also posted my old how to change the front pinion writeup. Hope these writeups get put to good use.

I have more that I will be posting up tomorrow morning. Keep on the lookout. I might even have saved some of the Ol' O.G cag tuner responses.

Eric

daniel said:
yea change the filter and line they are weak points. especially the line. they suck ass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
474 Posts
alright, I changed my filter but used the stock line, might have to replace that sometime soon before the fuel eats it away? is that the problem with it. I was kinda impresed that my fuel filter had a magnet in it to pick up any metal that could have slipped past the mesh screen. dont know when that would happen though. but I replaced it with a nice fram one anyways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
no way

Nail polish remover or acetone will eat the paint, the plastic and be horrible, i would just use the WD personally. Try it out take some nail polish remover and rub it on plastic or paint and see


blueR1cag said:
WD40 wont take off paint AS FAR AS I KNOW, I have gotten it on paint all the time though. and no it wont ruin the tires. WD40 isnt the best thing to get the sticker goo off wiht though, something like nail polish remover, acetone works WAY WAY better, and if you dont want something that harsh on your bike get some goo gone or soak a rag in simple green and just let it lay on the sticker(not for real long though, I spilled alot of it once, soaked it up in a rag and threw the rag on my orange metal toolbox, well, now my toolbox is not all orange, it just ruined the paints bond to the box, looked fine but when I rubbed it there the paint came off in a sheet of paint) goo gone would be best bet.

also if its dirt on the rotor use acetone or soemthing like that, no WD40, although the rear brake does about nothing on these little things you dont want any kind of residue on the rotor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I wanted to add to the list. Take your carb off and check the gasket between the manifold and reed block. My gasket was over hanging 1/3 of the reed opening. Trim to fit properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
What stickers are you trying to remove? I removed the few stickers that came on the bike without any chemicals. Just use a blow dryer to heat them up before you touch them. This softens the glue and reduces it's bonding strength. once they are good and hot just start at one corner and gently peel them off. if they start to tear, stop, heat them a bit more and start again from the other side of the sticker. If any residue remains just use the sticker and dab at the residue and it will generally pull off with the sticker.

If you tryed removing the stickers cold, you're screwed. you'll have to remove the mess with some sort of chemical. don't use acetone or any harsh solvents. WD40 takes a little more elbow grease but won't harm your paint. The real key to removing most any kind of sticker from most anything though is heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,501 Posts
yeah heat is the easiest way to remove those paper backed stickers. i also tried using carburator cleaner. id heat up the sticker, soak it up with carb cleaner and scrub it off with a rag. i didnt really care a bout the paint comming off or scratching because my bike looked kinda crappy anyways.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
i took the warning label off my cag with my fingers 1st then i used some ronsinol lighter fluid and it took the sticky stuff off instantly and the paint was fine.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top